Eurythmy Position Available in Sonoma, CA

Woodland Star Charter School is a Waldorf Charter School located in Sonoma, California. We have approximately 250 students from kindergarten through 8th grade. Our dedicated, experienced faculty is supported with a faculty/college, education director, administrator and staff. We have a strong, diverse parent body that is focusing on increasing the feeling of community in the school. We are looking for a eurythmy teacher to teach one 5 to 8 week block that will include grades k through 8. If possible we would like to give the whole school the experience of eurythmy during the block including classes for the faculty/co-workers and parents.

Sonoma, California is a small city with a small town ambience. It is located in the scenic wine country of Northern California with easy access to San Francisco and many beautiful natural sites. If you are interested please view our web site http://www.woodlandstarschool.org/ and contact Robert Bucher robert@woodlandstarschool.org curriculum director to discuss the possibility.

Eurythmy Teacher Needed in Wasatch Waldorf Charter School, Salt Lake City UT

Full-time position for an enthusiastic eurythmist who is committed to bringing eurythmy to children.

Wasatch Waldorf Charter School opened its doors in August 2016 to 540 students. In this foundational year, the school has been blessed with visits from Eurythmy Spring Valley, Kim John Payne, Jack Petrash and other inspiring individuals. All of the teachers are trained or in the process of training. Teachers receive ongoing mentor support and professional development opportunities throughout the year.

We are looking for a committed eurythmist to join our faculty. Responsibilities include teaching grades one through five, serving on the festival committee, assisting with parent meetings, leading faculty eurythmy in tandem with the two other eurythmists at the school and collaborating on artistic eurythmy projects.

The school building houses a beautiful large eurythmy room with a sprung floor. The auditorium is connected to it and has the possibility of opening up to transform the space into a stage for eurythmy.

There is a pianist on the staff that will accompany every eurythmy class.

Teachers at Wasatch Waldorf enjoy a competitive salary and generous benefits that include health and dental insurance, professional development opportunities and a retirement savings plan.

To apply, send resume and letter of intent to Prairie Adams at padams@wasatchwaldorf.org

Eurythmy Teacher Needed in Nashville, Tennessee

Linden Waldorf School is located in vibrant Nashville, Tennessee, which offers a cosmopolitan sophistication with big city amenities including major league sports, museums, dance, theatre, arts and a legendary music scene. Nashville is called “The Athens of the South” and boasts 18 universities and colleges. Nestled in the rolling hills of Middle Tennessee, it is a growing, multi-cultural city with a rich history and an exciting future. Our school operates on a shared 12-acre campus with Trinity Presbyterian Church situated just minutes away from the bustle of downtown between Vanderbilt University and The Green Hills Mall.

Our school serves approximately 200 students in preschool through eighth grade. We are a candidate for full membership in AWSNA. A dedicated, experienced, and diverse faculty is supported by a Faculty Leadership Council, Faculty Chair, Administrative Chair and a capable administrative team. Linden Waldorf School receives generous support from a strong parent community and the greater Nashville community. Visit our website, www.lindenwaldorf.org, for more information.

Linden Waldorf School is seeking a qualified, trained individual to teach two six week blocks of Eurythmy to our early childhood thru eighth grade classes. Eurythmy for four early childhood classes thru grade two will occur once a week and twice weekly for grades 3-8. This person will work as a part of a committed team of teachers and be an active member of our school community.

Eurythmy Job Description PDF

Eurythmy Teacher Needed in Saratoga Springs NY

The Waldorf School of Saratoga Springs New York is looking for a Middle and High School Eurythmy teacher for the 2017-2018 school year. The Saratoga School has a well-established Eurythmy curriculum for all the students from Kindergarten through high school. There is a Eurythmist as part of our faculty teaching the grades and a piano accompanist for all classes.

The Waldorf School of Saratoga Springs was founded in 1981 and currently serves approximately 250 children nursery through 12th grade. We have as Absolute Charter from the University of the State of New York Education Department. We are accredited by the New York State Association of Independent Schools and are full members of the Association of Waldorf Schools of North America.

Our eclectic suburban campus is spread over three historic buildings, all within walking distance of each other in the lovely town of Saratoga Springs, New York. Our Forest Kindergarten hosts three classes and is located on land leased from New York States Parks, two miles outside of town.

Saratoga Springs is a charming Victorian resort town nestled in the foothills of the Adirondacks with a population of approximately 30,000. We are three hours from Boston, New York City and Montreal. Our location offers four delightful seasons, proximity to both wilderness and major cities, and at the same time a comfortable small-town feeling. Because of our popularity as a summer-time destination, Saratoga Springs offers many world class cultural events, such as hosting the New York City Ballet and the Philadelphia Orchestra. We have a thriving music and theater life, restaurants, shops and community events.

If you are interested in applying for any of these positions, please send your letter of interest, resume and three references to: Julie Niles, Business Manager, 122 Regent Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866 or email:hr@waldorfsaratoga.org

Rudolf Steiner school of Geneva is seeking a Eurythmy teacher

As of the beginning of the school year 2017-18, the Rudolf Steiner school of Geneva is seeking a Eurythmy teacher (french-speaking). The position offered is part time, covering either primary school or high school. The potential candidates must be proficient in teaching Eurythmy and must have successfully completed the Waldorf training.

All applications must be sent for May 24th 2017, at the latest, at the following address:

emploi@ersge.ch

Seeking a part-time Eurythmy teacher in England

Elmfield Rudolf Steiner School is looking for an experienced Eurythmy Teacher for Classes 5 to 8 and some Modules in the Upper School. Ideally you should have a Eurythmy qualification, together with either a state teaching qualification, Waldorf Diploma or experience of teaching Eurythmy in a Waldorf School.
 
You should also have excellent classroom management skills and be able to create and maintain a positive and healthy climate for learning, as well as an age appropriate coherent curriculum. 
 
If you wish to know more about this exciting opportunity please email Diana Ball, on diana.ball@elmfield.com
 
Application forms must be received by 26th May 2017 via email to info@elmfield.com or post to Elmfield School, Love Lane, Stourbridge, DY8 2EA.
 
Elmfield Rudolf Steiner School is located in Stourbridge, 30 minutes from Birmingham, Worcester and Wolverhampton, and only a few minutes from the Clent Hills.  We follow the Waldorf curriculum, providing all-round education for children aged 3-17 years.  We’re on an exciting journey of growth and development and it’s a great time to join us.  

Seeking Full Time Eurythmy Teacher to join our eurythmy faculty.

Emerson Waldorf School (EWS) is now accepting applications from an
enthusiastic Eurythmy teacher for the 2017–18 school year.

A primary task for this position is to establish eurythmy in our high school
and middle school, however depending on the candidates strengths,
possibilities exist for sharing the work thoughout the school.  Therapeutic
or Hygenic eurythmy skills would be a plus.16 classes is the maximum
teaching load.

The teacher will join our experienced Eurythmy teacher and a committed,
supportive faculty.  EWS has a vibrant student body and a culture where
Eurythmy is well-respected.  Performance and mentoring opportunities are
available.

Candidates must hold of diploma from a Eurythmy training recognized by the
section for the Performing Arts of the Anthroposophical Society, Dornach,
Switzerland.

For information contact: Christina Beck, cbeck@emersonwaldorf.org (school
eurythmist) or 919-643-2066.

Emerson Waldorf School (EWS), set on fifty-four wooded acres, was founded in
1984 and offers grades N-12. EWS became a full member of AWSNA in 1998 and
is accredited by NCAIS and SAIS. The Research Triangle Area of North
Carolina, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, is growing rapidly and is situated
midway between the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Atlantic coast. Please visit
our Relocation Info page to learn more about the area.

Emerson Waldorf School has a deep commitment to creating an inclusive
community which values diversity and multi-culturalism, and we seek
candidates who have this same commitment.

EWS offers a competitive annual salary with generous annual teaching
experience increments, health benefits and full tuition remission for
children of full time salaried employees.  EWS offers a full Waldorf
education, nursery through 12th grade, and is an AWSNA full member school,
and accredited with SAIS/SACS.  Experienced, strong faculty share warm
collegiality and a healthy understanding of cooperative leadership.

If you are interested in joining our exceptional faculty, please email your
resume and cover letter, brief biographical sketch, and three references to:
Kelley Wiley, Communications Director, emersonian@emersonwaldorf.org
Emerson Waldorf School
6211 New Jericho Road, Chapel Hill, North Carolina  27516 | 919-967-1858
x113

Seeking a Eurythmy Teacher in Sydney Australia

Eurythmy Teacher.

Lorien Novalis School, located in the Hills District of Sydney, Australia, is seeking a Eurythmist to teach Class 1 to Year 12, and teachers.

In all 45 years of Lorien Novalis’ establishment, Eurythmy has played a fundamental and vital role in the education of children, teachers and the general school community.

We are seeking a dynamic and creative person who has a broad understanding of the developmental stages of childhood and wants to share their love for Eurythmy.

The ideal candidate would work with warmth and flexibility toward the students across all the classes; have the willingness to work with in collaboration with faculty members for festivals and performances; and have a genuine interest in Anthroposophy.

Experience in teaching and the possibility to gain NSW BOSTES teaching qualifications in Australia are a bonus.

Our school holds a remarkable newly built Eurythmy room that is a delight to work in and will inspire the right person to call it home.

http://www.lorien.nsw.edu.au/about-lorien-novalis/school-facilities/

Please see our website for further information about our school.

http://www.lorien.nsw.edu.au/

For further enquiries please contact Norman Sievers – Principal

< norms@lorien.nsw.edu.au >

 

 

Copper Balls

Dear Friends,
I am excited to announce that my copper products are now conveniently available from Amazon in case you need one immediately.  I would greatly appreciate if you could visit the page and leave some customer feedback on the Amazon product page.
I continue to accept orders from my page where Copper Rods are available. I especially like that because I can interact with you and make new friends.
On Amazon
Large Copper Ball:
Small Copper Ball:
Birch Ball Stand:
My current product assortment on Amazon including art cards can be find below link:

Hoping you are all well,

All the best,
Leonore Russell

Eurythmy Performance at Carnegie Hall

Gabrielle Armenier Eurythmy Agency Presents

WEILL RECITAL HALL  at CARNEGIE HALL
Lee-Chin Siow Violin
Svetlana Smolina Piano
Gabrielle Armenier Eurythmy
February 8th, 2017 – 8 PM

Featuring a U.S. Premiere and a New York City Premiere, East touches West in this exciting new program which explores the gestural qualities of French and Chinese music through the movement art of eurythmy, the artistry of Singaporean violinist Lee-Chin Siow, Russian pianist Svetlana Smolina and French eurythmist Gabrielle Armenier.

With the concept of polarities of touch as meeting ground, Franck’s Violin Sonata will speak to the romanticism of the Butterfly Lovers Violin Concerto, while Ravel’s Tzigane encounters its counterpart in Singaporean composer Kam Kee Yong’s Kuang Xiang Qu, affectionately nicknamed the ‘Chinese Tzigane’.

Program
Silent Eurythmy Introduction
FRANCK Violin Sonata
BIZET HOROWITZ Carmen Variations
RAVEL Tzigane
Intermission
YAO CHEN Air  –  New York City Premiere
A solo work written for violinist Lee-Chin Siow
CHEN GANG/HE ZHANHAO The Butterfly Lovers Violin Concerto
KAM KEE YONG Kuang Xiang Qu – “Chinese Rhapsody” – U.S. Premiere

Official Website TICKETS

The Speech Sound Etudes: Feeling the Gestures and Finding the Figures

First posted on 10-13-14
Revised January 2017

A DETAILED RESEARCH REPORT
BY KATE REESE HURD
ORIGINALLY SUBMITTED IN HONOR OF MICHAELMAS 2014

READ PDF

In this report, I share the fruits of my re-approach to eurythmy after having put it aside for over two decades. I have been laying a fresh foundation for my artistic activity by means of the intensive speech-work I’ve been doing in response to one of Dr. Rudolf Steiner’s first advices to Lory Maier-Smits, our first eurythmist. He had suggested to her that she write sentences focussing on single vowel sounds. As she recorded it, “I should do speech exercises. Speak sentences which had only one vowel, and observe exactly what was happening in my throat, and this I should then … dance! As an example he wrote: ‘Barbara sass stracks am Abhang’ [Barbara sat directly on the slope].” But it is clear by Lory’s further report that she was not able to find speech sound gestures through doing this. Therefore, Dr. Steiner began to give her suggestions for how to do gestures for the sounds.

However, I have discovered that through following his first advices to her – and with proper preparation – one can in fact feel and find the gesture-impulses of the sounds directly and with ever-greater definition and certainty. This applies to all of the speech sounds, both vowels and consonants. This report shares in detail my unfoldment of this work and the magnificent treasure that has emerged from it. A secure foundation for the work of speech eurythmy can be laid “from within” – just as The Eurythmy Meditation directs us to do. Dependence on mental imagery and being shown how to do gestures can be eliminated through firsthand perception and cognition of the speech sound gesture-impulses in the way I describe, as objective facts.

As a graduated eurythmist, I taught lay speech eurythmy; but although I knew that I was a good teacher, I wasn’t able to embody eurythmy at all well enough to command the respect for it that I felt it deserves. I set it aside. Two questions ached in me all these years: What is missing here? And even if I knew what is missing, what would satisfy that need? I always carried the idea that if eurythmy was lost we could find it again. Since the ‘eurythmizing’ of our own larynx is what we are supposed to lead over into the movement of our limbs, we would always have the means of recovering eurythmy from within and of discovering ever-fresh possibilities. My recent work confirms this. Everything we need can be found from within.

This report is firstly for eurythmists, but what I reveal provides speech artists with the means to seek and find a fresh foundation for their work, too. I invite you all into the effort! Speakers might also want to see my article on poetic recitation, “Etheric Bodies are Moving to the Speech Sound Etudes,” in the Spring 2016 EANA Newsletter. A revised version of it with an enlarged log of the poems I have presented so far – along with their respective sound-moods which I evoke through speaking etudes – is contained in my booklet, A Quartet of Articles on Eurythmy and Speech-Work.

East Bay Waldorf School is Seeking Eurythmy Teacher K-8

Bring Eurythmy to our school! (K-8)

Jan 06 2017 | East Bay Waldorf School | El Sobrante, CA

East Bay Waldorf School is currently seeking a trained and experienced Eurythmy Teacher at approximately 80% time in grades K-8 for the 2017-18 school year.

We are looking for someone who is positive, creative, has strong organizational skills, and communicates well with colleagues, administration, and parents. We value excellent teaching and classroom management skills, artistic integrity, and a deep understanding of child development. We have a comprehensive and contemporary program along with an accompanist. Eurythmy has been a strong program at the school and the children are receptive and joyful in class. Lessons are taught in a bright room with bamboo/cork flooring and a Steinway piano.

Ideal candidates have completed a full Eurythmy training and a Bachelor’s degree, have experience teaching, and are committed to collaborative work with colleagues and self development. Our full time base salary is $50,000 with increments for teaching experience and health, dental, tuition remission, mentoring and financial support for professional development

——————————————————————————————
Our Campus
East Bay Waldorf School is an independent AWSNA- and WECAN-accredited school, located in El Sobrante, California in the beautiful, thriving East Bay hills – just minutes from Berkeley and San Francisco. Our site combines the best of two worlds: an idyllic natural setting with open fields and gardens, adjacent to regional parks and wild lands, and within thirty minutes of the major cultural and urban centers of the San Francisco Bay.

Our School
Our school was founded in 1980 and offers a complete Preschool-8th Grade Waldorf education, as well as thriving Parent-Child and Parent Education programs. For the 2016-2017 school year EBWS will serve over 180 students, from infancy through Grade 8. We have excellent teachers, an active parent body, a strong board and serve as the campus for the Bay Area Center for Waldorf Teacher Training (BACWTT).

Our People
Through strong collegial collaboration, grounded in a solid commitment to anthroposophy, the faculty work closely together to ensure and support our thriving school. Our teachers are committed to lifelong learning and developing themselves both personally and professionally. Knowing how to build and maintain strong relationships with students, parents and colleagues is essential. We offer a competitive benefits package to full time faculty, with additional compensation for experience.

How to Apply
Candidates should familiarize themselves with the school via this website prior to applying. Please send your resume, along with a letter of interest, highlighting your teaching experience, life experience, qualifications and strengths. In addition, please include three references that we may contact. Please submit an email resume to jobs@eastbaywaldorf.org.

The East Bay Waldorf School is an Equal Opportunity Employer and welcomes applicants of any color, race, gender, sexual orientation, and all ethnic, national, cultural, social and religious backgrounds.

Van der Pals/ Kirchner-Bockholt Tone Eurythmy Therapy Course to be held in English by Jan Ranck

The course is warmly recommended for trained eurythmists, eurythmy therapists, medical doctors, music therapists and students in these fields

*USA October 21 – 30, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois at 2135 West Wilson Avenue

England April 17 – 26, 2017 in Peredur, East Grinstead, near London

USA July 20 – 29, 2017 in Glenmoore, Pennsylvania at Camp Hill Beaver Run

The USA courses are sponsored by ATHENA and therapeutic eurythmists who are members are eligible to apply for grants via athenacorrespondence@gmail.com

*In Chicago some free accommodation is available on a first-come first-serve basis 

Information and Registration: abdalma@gmail.com

(in the subject field please write “Chicago”, “Peredur” or “Beaver Run” and your name) 

Inspired by Rudolf Steiner’s indication that tone eurythmy therapy should be developed in addition to speech eurythmy therapy, the eurythmist Lea van der Pals and the medical doctor Margarete Kirchner-Bockholt worked together in the late 1950’s to develop a sequence of exercises in connection with the diseases discussed in Rudolf Steiner and Ita Wegman’s book “Extending Practical Medicine”.

This course, which includes a review of all of the elements of tone eurythmy, was taught for many years by Lea van der Pals within various eurythmy therapy trainings, and the effectiveness of the exercises was shown in practice. When for health reasons Lea van der Pals was prevented from continuing to teach, she passed the torch to Annemarie Baeschlin, who took over holding the course and assisted Lea van der Pals in bringing the material into book form.

At this time Jan Ranck held the practice sessions within Annemarie Baeschlin’s courses, and was also involved with compositional and editorial suggestions for the publication “Ton-Heileurythmie”, Verlag am Goetheanum 1991, published in English in 2009 as “Tone Eurythmy Therapy” by the Medical Section at the Goetheanum.

Jan Ranck was born in America, where she studied music and comparative arts at Indiana University in Bloomington.  She accompanied the London Stage Group on their 1976 USA tour and went on to study eurythmy in Dornach with Lea van der Pals. She was a faculty member of the Eurythmeum in Dornach and The London School of Eurythmy.  After completing a eurythmy therapy training in Stuttgart in 1989 she moved to Israel and is currently the founding director of the Jerusalem Eurythmy Ensemble (1990) and the Jerusalem Academy of Eurythmy (1992).  She is also an instructor in the Jerusalem Waldorf Teacher Bachelor Program in David Yellin Academic College, and a guest teacher in various venues worldwide, including the Goetheanum and the MA Program in Eurythmy held in Emerson College and Spring Valley.  She is the representative for Israel in the International Department of Eurythmy Therapy (“Eurythmy Therapy Forum”).

Besides the material mentioned above, Lea van der Pals’ book “The Human Being as Music” (Robinswood Press 1992), published in German in 1969 as “Der Mensch Musik”, is highly recommended as background reading for the course.

Weekend Eurythmy Workshop in Kingston, ON

Soulful by Design, presents…
Dynamic Name™ Mandala:
Exploring Relationships through Harmonious Movement

A weekend eurythmy retreat with Soulful Wizardess Marta Stemberger
When: October 14-16, 2016
Where: Soulful by Design retreat, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
Investment: $359 CDN
Space is limited to 10 people. Register early.
Register before October 1st + save: $325 CDN
(includes shared accommodations, meals & snacks)
For more info and to register visit ssi.hamoves.net/soulful-by-design
Your name holds a key to who you are and a secret to your purpose in this lifetime. Uncover the astrology hidden in your name and its immense potential for self-inquiry, relationships, conflict resolution, and team building. Connect deeper with yourself, the spiritual world, and with each other.
Explore the dynamics of relating through harmonious movement art of eurythmy. Discover how to untangle conflicts into awareness and understanding. Transform the flow of energy into conscious kinesthetic perception in the body, a valuable tool for harmonious relationships.

Move your song, feel your Soul. Dance your name, know thyself.

PDF Poster

 

Van der Pals/ Kirchner-Bockholt Tone Eurythmy Therapy Course to be held in English by Jan Ranck

October 21 – 30, 2016 in Chicago Illinois at 2135 West Wilson Avenue

(note change of date from July)

The course is warmly recommended for trained eurythmists, eurythmy therapists, medical doctors and music therapists (see report below from Ballytobin, Ireland).

Information and Registration: abdalma@gmail.com

Some free accommodation available on a first-come, first serve basis.

Inspired by Rudolf Steiner’s indication that tone eurythmy therapy should be developed in addition to speech eurythmy therapy, the eurythmist Lea van der Pals and the medical doctor Margarete Kirchner-Bockholt worked together in the early 1970s to develop a sequence of exercises in connection with the diseases discussed in Rudolf Steiner and Ita Wegman’s book “Extending Practical Medicine”.

This course, which includes a review of all of the elements of tone eurythmy, was taught for many years by Lea van der Pals within various eurythmy therapy trainings, and the effectiveness of the exercises was shown in practice. When for health reasons Lea van der Pals was prevented from continuing to teach, she passed the torch to Annemarie Baeschlin, who took over holding the course and assisted Lea van der Pals in bringing the material into book form.

At this time Jan Ranck held the practice sessions within Annemarie Baeschlin’s courses, and was also involved with compositional and editorial suggestions for the publication “Ton – Heileurythmie”, Verlag am Goetheanum 1991, published in English in 2009 as “Tone Eurythmy Therapy” by the Medical Section at the Goetheanum.

Jan Ranck was born in America, where she studied music and comparative arts at Indiana University in Bloomington.  She accompanied the London Stage Group on their 1976 USA tour and went on to study eurythmy in Dornach with Lea van der Pals. She was a faculty member of the Eurythmeum in Dornach and The London School of Eurythmy. After completing a eurythmy therapy training in Stuttgart in 1989 she moved to Israel and is currently the founding director of the Jerusalem Eurythmy Ensemble (1990) and the Jerusalem Academy of Eurythmy (1992).  She is also an instructor in the Jerusalem Waldorf Teacher Bachelor Program in David Yellin Academic College, and a guest teacher in various venues worldwide, including the Goetheanum and the MA Program in Eurythmy held in Emerson College and Spring Valley. She is the representative for Israel in the International Department of Eurythmy Therapy (“Eurythmy Therapy Forum”).

Besides the material mentioned above, Lea van der Pals’ book “The Human Being as Music” (Robinswood Press 1992), published in German in 1969 as “Der Mensch Musik”, is highly recommended as background reading for the course.

 

Report from the course held in Ballytobin, Ireland:

English Speakers Take Note!

This spring, a unique event took place in English for eurythmists from all over the world.  In Camphill Ballytobin, Ireland, eighteen eurythmists came together from 1-10 April under the invigorating guidance of Jan Ranck, founding director of the Jerusalem Academy of Eurythmy, to learn and experience the Tone Eurythmy Therapy Course as developed by Lea van der Pals and Dr. Margarete Kirchner-Bockholt.  Long held in German by Annemarie Bäschlin, this is the first time since the 80’s that it has been accessible in English.  There were eight eurythmists from Ireland, five from Australia, two from Japan and one each from Taiwan, Sweden and England.  Jan put us through our paces by bringing us back into contact with the basics of Tone Eurythmy—beat, rhythm and pitch, major/minor triads, ethos/pathos, scales, intervals….If one had been listening at keyholes, one might have thought we were in training for the circus as we ‘swallowed our rods’, swung on trapezes, and held acrobats on our arms (we even attempted to become Octopi!)—all images calling for great inner – outer activity!  Having laid the basic foundations, Jan then brought us through nine sequences of tone eurythmy exercises developed in relationship to specific illnesses, emphasizing the importance of our own skill and mastery of the elements of eurythmy in order to convey them to the patient.

In addition to Jan’s demanding yet entertaining approach, we had the privilege of having the concert pianist Michael Zelevinsky at the piano, also from Jerusalem.  It was a great joy, especially for the many of us who work without accompanists, to move to music so beautifully and sensitively played.  Every evening Michael gave a recital on the Steinway grand, a rare opportunity to feed one’s soul!

We are indebted to Gina Poole for having the idea of bringing the training to English-speakers and to Camphill Ballytobin for their generosity in giving us the free use of Castalia Hall for our work.  Thanks also go to the Anthroposophical Society in Ireland for their generous donation towards covering costs.  Most especially we thank Jan for bringing this training to the English-speaking world.  It was the deep feeling of all of the participants not only that the course be repeated one day in Ballytobin, but that others may imitate Gina’s initiative in other locations world-wide.  Jan confirmed that she is open to the idea.

 

            Thank you Jan!

                                                            Roxanne Leonard

WHAT MOVES YOU is the largest Youth Eurythmy Event worldwide.

Join us and become part of an unique community for a summer full of energy, music and movement. This year´s project in Berlin, Germany will be the last one, so don´t miss it!
Sign up for this grand eurythmy event until 30 April 2016. Applying is easy, check it out at: http://www.whatmovesyou.de/en/
More questions? See our FAQ at http://www.whatmovesyou.de/en/teilnahme/fragen or send us an e-mail. We would be happy to help.
 
Best Regards,
André Macco

World Eurythmy Therapy Conference

Dear Eurythmists,

herewith we would like to send you information about the World Eurythmy Therapy Conference.
All eurythmists are invited to this conference!

www.goetheanum.org/Welt-Heileurythmiekonferenz.7742.0.html?&L=1

With many regards,
Hanna Koskinen

Sektion für Redende und Musizierende Künste
Hanna Koskinen
Goetheanum
Postfach
CH-4143 Dornach
Tel.  41 (0)61 706 43 59
srmk@goetheanum.ch
srmk.goetheanum.org

Music that Moves Me

by Truus Geraets

Brings together
The human voice in singing and
The singing of the whole body in movement

Truus Geraets created this book, based upon her deep love for music, and especially for singing.
All inspired by a life time working with Eurythmy as an Art and as Therapy.

51 Pages Text, 41 Songs in Musical Notation
Demonstration video, Showing how the materials can be used working with individual children  as well as with groups of younger and older people  or just as a self-help book

Cost $ 34 + sh/h Payment possible thru PayPal
or send check to 782 E. Mariposa St. A, Altadena, CA 91001
Also available: “The Healing Power of Eurythmy” as an E-book ($43 +sh/h)
Orders to truus.geraets@gmail.com or by phone 626 219 6010

Van der Pals/ Kirchner-Bockholt Tone Eurythmy Therapy Course

to be held in the USA by Jan Ranck
for trained eurythmists, eurythmy therapists, medical doctors, students of medicine and music therapists
July 24th – August 2nd, 2016 — Venue TBA

Inspired by Rudolf Steiner’s indication that tone eurythmy therapy should be developed in addition to speech eurythmy therapy, the eurythmist Lea van der Pals and the medical doctor Margarete Kirchner-Bockholt worked together in the early 1970s to develop a sequence of exercises in connection with the diseases discussed in Rudolf Steiner and Ita Wegman’s book “Extending Practical Medicine”.

This course, which includes a review of all of the elements of tone eurythmy, was taught for many years by Lea van der Pals within various eurythmy therapy trainings, and the effectiveness of the exercises was shown in practice. When for health reasons Lea van der Pals was prevented from continuing to teach, she passed the torch to Annemarie Baeschlin, who took over holding the course and assisted Lea van der Pals in bringing the material into book form. At this time Jan Ranck held the practice sessions within Annemarie Baeschlin’s courses, and was also involved with compositional and editorial suggestions for the publication “Ton – Heileurythmie”, Verlag am Goetheanum 1991, published in English in 2009 as “Tone Eurythmy Therapy” by the Medical Section at the Goetheanum.

Jan Ranck did her eurythmy training in Dornach with Lea van der Pals, and her therapeutic eurythmy training in Stuttgart. She was a faculty member of the Eurythmeum in Dornach and The London School of Eurythmy and is the founding director of the Jerusalem Eurythmy Ensemble (1990) and the Jerusalem Academy of Eurythmy (1992). She is also an instructor in the Jerusalem Waldorf Teacher Bachelor Program in David Yellin Academic College, and a guest teacher in various venues worldwide, including the Goetheanum, and the MA Program in Eurythmy held in Emerson College. She represents Israel in the International Department of Eurythmy Therapy within the Medical Section (“Eurythmy Therapy Forum”).

Besides the material mentioned above, Lea van der Pals’ book “The Human Being as Music” (Robinswood Press 1992), published in German in 1969 as “Der Mensch Musik”, is highly recommended as background reading for the course.

Information and Registration: tali.wandel@gmail.com

Professional Eurythmy Conference

February 14-17, 2016
with Maren Stott of Eurythmy West Midlands
at East Bay Waldorf School in El Sobrante, CA (San Francisco Bay Area)
The conference begins Sunday evening with a performance of J.S. Bach’s Chaconne
and other pieces by Maren Stott. The daily schedule includes: 2 sessions of Tone
Eurythmy, Solo Masterclass, Pedagogical Sharing (5 grade levels per day
[pK-12/adult], bring your best pieces to share!), a Tea Break with snacks provided,
an optional Plenum, and time in the evening to explore the Bay Area. Wednesday
evening concludes the course with a collective performance of our work.
Conference fee $250. Limited to 23 participants.
Please RSVP to reserve your space with Isabella or Jazmin. A registration form and
more detailed information will be sent to you. Housing and meals are not included.
Scholarship/Work Study and local inexpensive housing is available as well as
catered lunches if there is enough interest. Please indicate your need when
registering.
Isabella: nijinska@hotmail.com
Jazmin: jazminmeilan@gmail.com

Click here for the PDF version!

Michael and the Being of Eurythmy – A Christmas Imagination

The Anthroposophical Society in America is pleased to collaborate with the Kolisko Institute in offering a free webinar in December

Michael and the Being of Eurythmy – A Christmas Imagination

Wednesday, December 9, 2015 at 8:00 p.m. EST

with presenter Ross Rentea, MD

Rudolf Steiner considered eurythmy to be one of the core principles of anthroposophy, and anticipated that along with meditation, it would become an intimate part of one’s daily life.

Since anthroposophy is so closely connected with Michael, a key question becomes – what is the connection of Michael with eurythmy?

In this webinar, Ross will share his thoughts and insights with the hope to intensify – or rekindle – our understanding and appreciation for this special movement activity given to help us connect with the spiritual world and support our efforts in becoming truly human.

The webinar is free, and donations to support these collaborative efforts will be gratefully accepted! To make a donation, please visit www.koliskoinstitute.org and click on the donate button. All donations are tax deductible and will be shared between the Anthroposophical Society and the Kolisko Institute.

Thank you!

Marian Leon
Director of Programs
Anthroposophical Society in America

The Bay Area Eurythmy Ensemble presents:

The Tale of the Golden Fish

 The Tale of the Golden Fish
November 7-13, 2015

Open Dress Rehearsal
Saturday, Nov. 7th, 3pm
3800 Clark Rd, El Sobrante

Camphill Communities California
Sunday, Nov. 8th, 4pm
3920 Fairway Dr, Soquel

Waldorf School of the Peninsula
Monday, Nov. 9th, 11:10am & 2pm
11311 Mora Dr, Los Altos
Rengstorff Community Center
201 S Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View

Marin Waldorf School
Tuesday, Nov. 10th, 9:30am
1755 Idylberry Rd, San Rafael

San Francisco Waldorf School
Wednesday, Nov. 11th, 12 noon
2938 Washington St, San Francisco

Sacramento Waldorf School
Thursday, Nov. 12th, 10:45am & 1:15pm
3750 Bannister Rd. Fair Oaks

East Bay Waldorf School
Friday, Nov. 13th, 9:30am
3800 Clark Rd, El Sobrante

Bay Area Center for Waldorf Teacher Training
Friday, Nov. 13th, 7:30pm
3800 Clark Rd, El Sobrante

Eurythmists: Michaela Bergmann, Ruth Bucklin, Isabella Guardia, Jazmin Hicks, Monika Leitz    Speaker: Fritz Brun    Piano: Cindy Chung

These performances are made possible by the Eurythmy Association of North America, Local Waldorf Schools and Teacher Trainings

Flyer: The Tale of the Golden Fish

Eurythmy Courses at the Goetheanum 2016

Dear Eurythmists,

Please find enclosed (see  PDF below) our program for eurythmy courses within the Section  for Performing Arts. During some of the courses there is a possibility to have a short translation into English, even if the courses principally take place in German.
If you have any questions to these courses (or translation), please contact the Section: srmk@goetheanum.ch
With warm regards, Hanna Koskinen

Eurythmie-Kurse_2016

Van der Pals/ Kirchner-Bockholt Tone Eurythmy Therapy Course to be held in English

by Jan Ranck

April 1-10, 2016, at Camphill Ballytobin, Ireland

The course is warmly recommended for trained eurythmists, eurythmy therapists, medical doctors and music therapists.

Information and Registration: ginapoole@outlook.com
As space is limited, early registration is recommended.

Inspired by Rudolf Steiner’s indication that tone eurythmy therapy should be developed in addition to speech eurythmy therapy, the eurythmist Lea van der Pals and the medical doctor Margarete Kirchner-Bockholt worked together in the early 1970s to develop a sequence of exercises in connection with the diseases discussed in Rudolf Steiner and Ita Wegman’s book “Extending Practical Medicine”.

This course was taught for many years by Lea van der Pals within various eurythmy therapy trainings, and the effectiveness of the exercises was proven in practice.
When for health reasons Lea van der Pals was prevented from continuing to teach, she passed the torch to Annemarie Baeschlin, who took over holding the course and assisted Lea van der Pals in bringing the material into book form.

At this time Jan Ranck held the practice sessions within Annemarie Baeschlin’s courses, and was also involved with compositional and editorial suggestions for the publication “Ton – Heileurythmie”, Verlag am Goetheanum 1991, published in English in 2009 as “Tone Eurythmy Therapy” by the Medical Section at the Goetheanum.

Jan Ranck did her eurythmy training in Dornach with Lea van der Pals, and her therapeutic eurythmy training in Stuttgart.
She was a faculty member of the Eurythmeum in Dornach and The London School of Eurythmy.
She is the founding director of the Jerusalem Eurythmy Ensemble (1990) and the Jerusalem Academy of Eurythmy (1992), and represents Israel in the International Department of Eurythmy Therapy (“Eurythmy Therapy Forum”).
She is also an instructor in the Jerusalem Waldorf Teacher Bachelor Program in David Yellin Academic College, and a guest teacher in various venues worldwide, including the Goetheanum, and the MA Program in Eurythmy held in Emerson College.

Besides the material mentioned above, Lea van der Pals’ book “The Human Being as Music” (Robinswood Press 1992), published in German in 1969 as “Der Mensch Musik”, is highly recommended as background reading for the course.

Anyone interested in initiating such a course in their own country may contact Jan directly at:   jranck@012.net.il

West Coast Fall Tour Itinerary – Eurythmy Spring Valley Ensemble

Tuesday, October 13 – Tuesday, October 27, 2015. The Ensemble is heading west this fall to California, Oregon and Washington states! It’s been quite a few years since we traveled to this region, so we are very excited to share our work and get to know the children and faculties in the different communities there. We hope you will pass the word along to anyone you know in these areas that we will soon be traveling their way. For more information about the tour, contact: Sea-Anna Vasilas, ESV Tour Coordinator, esvtour@eurythmy.org. Here are the stops on our tour:
San Francisco Waldorf School, San Francisco, CA:
October 13 – Daytime performances for children
7:30pm Public Evening Program: The Tide Is Turning

Summerfield Waldorf School, Petaluma, CA:
October 15 – Daytime performances for children
October 16 – Daytime performances for children
3:30-4:30pm Public Pedagogical Workshop
7:30 pm Public Evening Performance: The Tide Is Turning

Grass Valley Center for the Arts, Grass Valley, CA:
October 17 – 7pm Public Children’s Performance: The Donkey
8pm Public Evening Performance: The Tide Is Turning

Camphill Communities California, Soquel, CA:
October 19 – 4pm Public Children’s Performance: The Donkey
7:00 pm Public Evening Performance: The Tide Is Turning

Brightwater Waldorf School, Seattle, WA:
October 22 – Daytime performances for children (To be confirmed.)
7pm Public Evening Performance: The Tide Is Turning

Seattle Waldorf School, Seattle, WA:
October 23 – Daytime performances for children
6-9pm Potluck and Public Eurythmy Workshop(To be confirmed.)

Cedarwood Waldorf School, Portland, OR:
October 25 – 1pm Public Children’s Performance: The Donkey
4pm Public Performance: The Tide Is Turning

Portland Waldorf School, Portland, OR:
October 26 – Daytime performances for children (To be confirmed.)

Eugene Waldorf School, Eugene, OR:
October 27 – Daytime performances for children
7:30pm Public Evening Performance: The Tide Is Turning
*All times are subject to change, please check with each venue for specific details

Why Do Our Schools need Eurythmy? An Introduction to Eurythmy and Its Healing Influence in Schools

By Leonore Russell
One of the first questions parents ask when they come to learn about a Waldorf school for their child is about the movement art taught in most Waldorf schools: eurythmy. What is it? Why does my child have to do this? After many years of working as a eurythmy teacher and in the administration of a Waldorf schools, I find myself still answering these questions. Yet the answers grow and develop as the years pass and new knowledge both in science and education are bring light to bear on the questions.
First of all, what is eurythmy? It is a movement art, living in the family of movement arts such as mime and ballet yet standing midway between these two arts. It shares meaning and gesture with mime, yet it is married to sound rather than objects or recognizable actions, and shares the moving to music and words with dance, but seeks to follow the invisible movement within sound rather than move to it or juxtapose itself against it. It is the expression of the human soul through gesture and movement.

A student once asked: “who thought this up?” after seeing the same gestures in the great art of the past.  He had stumbled on the truth of the expressive gestures that artists such as Giotto and Michelangelo had mastered in their paintings. In the early part of the twentieth century Rudolf Steiner pointed us towards these gestures to learn their meaning and to find a new art of human movement. He worked with first a young girl and then an ever growing group of interested artists to develop this new art of movement. Continue reading

The Camphill Eurythmy School 1970 – 2014

It is with sadness that we announce the closure of our school. For some years now, the interest and accompanying finance from Camphill communities throughout the UK and Ireland has been waning. There are three main reasons for this:

  1. The absence of eurythmy as an active presence in many communities.
  2. The overall diminution of communities’ funds.
  3. The perception that communities’ terms of governance will not permit financial contributions to the school.
  4. Reduced student numbers.

Whatever the reasons, they amount to a tacit statement that a specifically Camphill eurythmy training is no longer relevant or sustainable. For the last three years, the Camphill Village Trust, of which the school is legally a part, has been covering the shortfall in income and has now decided it can no longer extend that facility. We submitted a plan to CVT that outlined a sustainable financial future for the school outwith the charity, with a re-structured fee system that would be fully operational in 2016. In the interim we hoped to secure continued financial resourcing from the charity and from the wider Camphill movement, but these attempts have been made too late. CVT have rejected the plan and taken the opportunity of our move towards leaving the charity to issue eviction orders to three members of the school staff.
The teachers of the school recognize that this is indeed the end of something, and that it is time to reflect on and celebrate all that the school has achieved and to seek to carry over its unique quality into something new. We are hopeful that many of our current students and applicants will be taken in by the West Midlands eurythmy training, and that our teachers will have a role in what can develop there.
Mixed with our sadness is immense gratitude. There are so many people to
whom we want to send our thanks:

  • To Dr Karl Koenig, for the vision of a eurythmy school in Camphill
  • To Evamaria Rascher for saying ‘yes’ to the vision.
  • To Peter Roth and Alex Baum, and the many co-workers at the Sheiling, Ringwood and in Botton Village, for sharing that vision and incarnating it into those communities.
  • To Monica Dorrington and Evamaria for those first lessons.
  • To the teachers of the Eurythmeum, Stuttgart and the London School of Eurythmy for god-parenting the school in its early days.
  • To Lea van der Pals who stood up for what many thought was a crazy idea.
  • To Christopher Kidman, Chas Bamford, Roman Shinov, Staya Wu, Cordula Rawson and all the inspired and dedicated eurythmists who have been members of the teaching faculty.
  • To Bonnie Cohen, for playing it so that it moves, and to all the exceptionally gifted musicians we have worked with.
  • To Timothy Edwards, and all those speech artists who have helped us to approach the mystery of the word.
  • To all the visiting and supporting teachers who have instructed our students in the richness of culture: art, music, science, poetry, architecture, medicine, gymnastics.
  • To all our students and graduates who come as a gift from the world, and return as a gift to the world.
  • Above all, to the seemingly disabled children, young people and adults who have accepted the art of eurythmy without reservation, and who probably understand it better than any of us.

To have been a teacher in the Camphill Eurythmy School has been to steer a ship by two stars: the star that shines over eurythmy, and the star that guides the impulse of curative education and social therapy. At times these stars have been in happy conjunction, at others in opposition, and trying to stay true to both has been a task requiring a firm yet soft hand on the wheel, the ability to constantly re-calibrate ones course, and the willingness to get wet.
If you gaze for a while at these two stars, the figures of Marie Steiner and Ita Wegman come into view; two guardians of anthroposophy between whom a rift appeared to the detriment of all of us who have, in our different ways, felt called upon to involve ourselves in the tasks they were entrusted with. Our school, in its own small way, has perhaps contributed something to the healing of this rift. When the school came to Botton in 1978, it was hoped that ‘these artists’ would have a civilising effect on a working, social-therapeutic community, and that the community would have a humanising effect on the artists. There is no way of measuring whether this has been achieved, other than to say that all of us who have been involved in this enterprise called the Camphill Eurythmy School know that, through it, we have taken a few more steps towards the goal of becoming truly human.

Rita Kort, Jonathan Reid and Evamaria Rascher. 23rd August 2014
Botton Village, Danby WHITBY YO21 2NJ camphilleurythmy@gmail.com

Eurythmy on the Stage – excerpt from Eurythmy DVD

“Eurythmy: Making Movement Human,” is the DVD from which this is excerpted. To purchase the complete DVD, visit www.millennialchild.com. Eurythmy is a new art form developed by Rudolf Steiner. This excerpt showcases the Goetheanum Eurythmy Group as they perform Sofia Gubaidulina’s “Seven Words.” Sam Russell’s camera work and creative editing capture the poetic quality of the group’s movement. A voiceover by Eugene Schwartz gives an overview of the significance of eurythmy for our time. Look at “Excerpt 2” to see the way in which eurythmy is used in Waldorf education.

Eurythmy and Waldorf Education – excerpt from Eurythmy DVD

“Eurythmy: Making Movement Human,” the DVD from which this is excerpted may be purchased at www.millennialchild.com. Eurythmy, a new art of movement developed by Rudolf Steiner, is a valuable educational tool. Today’s children need to MOVE, and eurythmy guides their movement to both great works of music and poetry. In this excerpt from a longer DVD, Sam Russell’s camerawork captures the beauty and joy of eurythmy classes in three Waldorf schools: Green Meadow Waldorf School, the Waldorf School of Princeton, and Kimberton Waldorf School. We see Maria ver Eecke teaching first and fifth graders (with commentary by Wendy Kelly), Tertia Gale teaching eighth graders, and Raymonde Fried teaching eleventh graders.

Pedagogical Eurythmy Teacher Position in Anchorage, Alaska

LOCATION: Winterberry Charter School, 4802 Bryn Mawr Ct, Anchorage, Alaska 99508

JOB DESCRIPTION: Winterberry Charter School in Anchorage, Alaska, is offering a full-time Pedagogical Eurythmy position for the 2014-2015 school year. Teaching responsibilities include all grades; two 40 minute classes per week with grades 1 – 8, one class per week for our home study students, and two 20 minute classes each week with our kindergarten class.

Our school is in the process of expanding our site and will have a 2,000sqft yurt in place beginning in the fall. Eurythmy is a brand new offering for our school program and we desire a teacher who is willing to grow this program within our community.

Benefits: $40,000year plus room, board, and professional development opportunities.

Requirements: The ideal candidate will have certification in Eurythmy, outstanding references, passion for children and education, a strong vision for what is possible, and the ability to work positively as a member of a healthy and collaborative school community.

Starting Date: Monday, August 11th, 2014

Calendar Year: Monday, August 11th, 2014 – Friday, May 22nd, 2015

Contact Name: Shanna Mall, Principal
Email: mall_shanna@asdk12.org
School Website: www.winterberrycharterschool.com

Contact Address:

Winterberry Charter School
4802 Bryn Mawr Court
Anchorage, AK 99508

907.742.0139

***INTERVIEWS WILL BE SCHEDULED FOR THE WEEK OF JUNE 23rd***

Seeking therapeutic eurythmist in Beaver Run, Camphill Special School.

We would like to invite a eurythmy colleague to join Carsten Callesen, Ute Heuser and Gillian Schoemaker here in Beaver Run, Camphill Special School.
The eurythmy work involves therapeutic eurythmy sessions, teaching a few classes, perhaps also in our training course for curative education.
There is also a possibility of joining the Pennsylvania Ensemble.
We would expect you to be integrated into our rich cultural and anthroposophical community life.
Please contact Gillian Schoemaker 610 469 0864
gillian_schoemaker@yahoo.com

HALTON WALDORF SCHOOL SEEKING EURYTHMY TEACHER

The Halton Waldorf School is inviting applications for a Eurythmy teacher for September 2014. The position will include kindergarten through grade 8 as well as occasional work with faculty and parents. Pedagogical eurythmy experience and/or training are a prerequisite for this position.

The Halton Waldorf School was founded in 1984 and is a full member of AWSNA. We have 170 students from parent and child to grade eight and an outstanding faculty and staff of 25. We are an established, thriving school offering a full Waldorf curriculum including French, German, art, handwork, woodwork, and physical education. Our faculty is grounded in a commitment to anthroposophy and we have an enthusiastic and supportive parent body and board of directors. The school has an art therapist and therapeutic eurythmist on staff and the faculty is deeply committed to music and the arts. Our eurythmy space is equipped with a sprung floor.

We are situated on five acres in northeast Burlington only minutes away from the natural wonders of the Niagara Escarpment and the shores of Lake Ontario. The amenities and culture of Toronto are a half-hour drive away.

The salary will be commensurate with experience. The school offers a generous benefits package as well as tuition remission for children of faculty.

To apply or inquire about the position, please contact:
Human Resources Committee
Halton Waldorf School
2193 Orchard Road
Burlington, Ontario, L7L 0H9
Phone: 905-331-4387
Email: info@haltonwaldorf.com
Website: www.haltonwaldorf.com

Application Deadline: June 20, 2014

Worldwide Eurythmy Conference

The Apollonian Course of 1915 Cosmic Word – Human Speech
6 – 10 April 2015
Conference of the Section for Performing Arts
The conference begins on Easter Monday, 6 April 2015, at 7 p.m. and ends on Friday, 10 April 2015, at 10 p.m.
In August 1915, Rudolf Steiner invited the four eurythmy teachers Elisabeth Dollfus, Tatiana Kisseleff, Lory Smits and Erna Wolfram to a course at the Goetheanum that would form the foundation for the further development of the cosmic dimension of eurythmy and of the soul qualities in speech. Now, a hundred years later, this conference will provide the framework for our explo- ration – in lectures, workshops and conversations – of the impulses given in 1915 and their unfolding since then. How are we making use of these foundations today?
Margrethe Solstad, Shaina Stoehr, Stefan Hasler
Further information

The Washington Waldorf School is seeking a full-time trained pedagogical eurythmist

The Washington Waldorf School is seeking a full-time trained pedagogical eurythmist to teach eurythmy to children from kindergarten through grade twelve. Responsibilities will include fifteen classes per week, carried in partnership with a veteran experienced eurythmist. Mentoring assistance and support will be provided and a piano accompanist is made available for classes. Frequent opportunities exist for performing, guiding more advanced groups and individuals, and giving workshops for parents and staff.
Interested applicants will demonstrate a commitment to the Waldorf educational philosophy and be able to work in a school community with flexibility and patience. Capacities and interests in working with the theater department and drama presentations are a plus. A minimum of one year of experience teaching eurythmy to elementary aged children is preferred. We are looking for someone who is enthusiastic, creative, and loving with students in addition to having an ability to work well with colleagues, administration, and parents.
Our school, founded in 1969, is located in Bethesda, MD, just outside of Washington, DC. overlooking the Potomac River. We are a well-established, vibrant Waldorf school with fully developed curriculum and programs. We have wonderful and enthusiastic students and a strong parent body. Our school is in close proximity to rich historical and cultural offerings, yet a short drive away from mountains and ocean. We welcome your interest.
Timing for beginning employment will be determined with the applicant. Please send letter of intent and resume to Marie Maurer, HR Associate, at mmaurer@washingtonwaldorf.org or mail to Washington Waldorf School, 4800 Sangamore Road, Bethesda, MD 20816.

Eurythmy Block Teacher for Oakland Steiner School (Michigan)

Eurythmy Block Teacher

The Oakland Steiner School (Michigan) is looking for a Eurythmy block teacher for a 5 week block, ideally starting January 7, 2013, for early childhood through Grade 8 classes. The block would include approximately 9 lessons a week plus weekly sessions with faculty and the possibility of parent classes. Please send a resume and a cover letter to: hr.oaklandsteiner@gmail.com.

Memoriam for Alice Pracht 1911-2000

By Dorothea Mier

Our dear friend, Alice Pracht (Sissy) died on November 12, and I would like to share some thoughts about her life. I very consciously begin with ‘our dear friend’ because not only did we experience her as such, but each time I visited her in the last eighteen years or so, she would remark how amazingly connected she felt to the friends and work in Spring Valley. She didn’t know why (then her characteristic little laugh), but she felt such a deep connection.

Continue reading

Eurythmy in Waldorf Schools

By Robin W. M. Mitchell

At times, the question arises, “What is eurythmy, and why is it so important in Waldorf education?”  In an attempt to answer these questions, I started by looking at a number of definitions of education. I have synthesized them into the following synopsis:

“Education brings about a state of knowledge and of aesthetic moral development, resulting from a learning process which develops skills needed by a person wishing to take charge of his or her own life.”

Encompassed in this definition, we can find attributes that go much further than a summation of known facts, held in memory.  Knowledge may be in the foreground – but it is a form of knowledge that finds its validity in relationship to living one’s life and making one’s own decisions. Skills are also mentioned.  Skills require practice so that they may be at the service of the individual who has taken the trouble to acquire them.  Aesthetic development unfolds the ability to recognize beauty when one meets it – and the lack of beauty as well.  On a different level, where knowledge presupposes the ability to look at facts as objective realities, aesthetic development presupposes that one has an inner life with a capacity for discernment.  In the sphere of moral consciousness, we can see a need for ones objective qualities to meet ones subjective qualities in harmony.  To sum it all up, we might say that education has to do with a journey into the knowledge of oneself in relationship to everything around us in the world.

Continue reading

Eurythmy and the Four Ethers

By Marjorie Spock

Aphorisms and Exercises

If we were to look really searchingly into the causes of today’s discontents we might find all of them stemming from a sense of having been disinherited. Few may be able to put a finger on just what has been lost or to say how we lost it. But something vital is missing from experience, an exuberant quality of life that earlier ages seem to have possessed. It can still be witnessed surfacing in the hops, skips, and jumps of early childhood and heard in the deep-chested laughs of tiny babies. But by the time adulthood is reached, a sad diminution has usually taken over, and most grown-ups look for it in vain.

Continue reading

The Eurythmy Figures as Keys to a Deeper Understanding of the Human Being

By Seth Morrison

Rudolf Steiner created his sketches for the eurythmy sound movements and soul gestures in 1922 and 1923. The new art form had grown and performances were seen on stages across Europe. Despite the devastation caused by the World War, the Waldorf School Movement flourished. Therapeutic eurythmy was only a few years old but found an enthusiastic reception among educators and medical doctors. The eurythmy figures grew out of this germinating power of an inspired art form. The figures became a kind of living study material. The trios and quartets of colors, the highly differentiated forms and characters of the figures provide schooling for the artist. When reconstructed in the act of artistic creation, a true inner work fills the experience of visible speech and music. The figures offer the eurythmist an unending source of self education.

In addition to the well-known aspects of color and form in the figures, a whole other pathway of study is contained within them. In a course given by Elena Zuccoli to students at the Curative Eurythmy School in Stuttgart, West Germany, in 1986, an introduction as well as a challenge was presented. Frau Zuccoli arranged the twelve consonant figures according to their relationship to the zodiac as described by Rudolf Steiner. She then asked the class, “What do you see?” Only one student responded! One half of the figures are represented in profile, the other face forward. There are three transitory figures. It is a striking image once it is ‘seen’! But what does this mean? Frau Zuccoli left this image as an unanswered question, a point of departure for her students. This little article will share my attempts to understand the meaning behind the special orientation of the figures, which has become a source of inspiration for my work in curative eurythmy.

Before launching ahead, it might be helpful to explore the experience of the human figure as it appears in profile as opposed to the frontal view. One hundred years ago, the silhouette was still a popular form of portraiture. The profile view of the torso reveals a sculptural impression. The shape of the shoulders, head, forehead, nose, lips, and chin appear fixed and formed. The profile is an image of what has been; the past up to the present moment. It is human destiny sculpted and made visible. The full face view of the human being gives an entirely different impression. The past lies somewhere in the distance, hidden behind the projected personality. The directions of dimensions of right and left fill out the ‘space’ of an incarnated person, be it narrow or broad, robust or hallowed out. There is a meeting with the present and an intuition of the future. The presence of human character, in its immediacy, fills space and projects itself into what will become the future.

When arranged according to their correspondences to the fixed stars, the figures for the sounds V (Aries), R (Taurus), and H (Gemini) are presented in profile. They face outward and away from the center of the circle. The figure for F (Cancer) however, also in profile, faces T and D (Leo). B and P (Virgo) face forward. The figure for Ch stands in a ¾ view. The S (Scorpion or Eagle) faces forward as does the G (Sagittarius). Its double letter K, stands in profile toward the N (Pisces). The N stands in profile toward the V (Aries), which joins the circle together. The figures for F, M, and CH are transitory with regard to the directionality of the entire circle of figures.

Rudolf Steiner’s spiritual research confirmed the idea of an astro-physiognomy of the human being. In countless manuscripts, painting, and drawings, most of which echo the mystery teachings of a forgotten time, one sees the human head marked with the sign of Aries or a ram. The Larynx is connected with the Bull, or Taurus, the shoulders with Gemini, and so on. The science of contemporary embryology was once seen from another point of view: the embryo lies curled up exactly as the circle of fixed stars appears in the heavens, the head in Aries and the feet in Pisces. One can imagine how the human embryo materializes out of the fluid world of the womb, somehow analogous to the creation of dry land in the book of Genesis of the Old Testament. Turning ones attention to the eurythmy figures, one can ‘enact’ this creation of man’s form through the eurythmy movements themselves, beginning with the V, which contours the head and going on to each region of the human form. It is a wonderful exercise. Now the special orientation of the figures begins to ‘speak’: the figures which correspond to the upper region of the human form all stand in profile and face outward into the depths of the periphery. They look away or back into another region of space. Aries, Taurus, and Gemini form a grouping. The human head is enclosed in a bony shell, like the insect. Its activity is contained within itself, invisible and concealed. It is inwardly mobile but outwardly immobile. The throat uses the air element but does not really change it. It adds to the air, instead. Its activity creates an enclosed, half-way internalized acoustic. The shoulders give width through the dimension of right and left. A tension, a dynamic holding together in equilibrium characterizes this region. The human being then acts as giver or receiver of world experienced every time he goes out of himself into the ‘other’; thus the H movement expresses how the arms become the instruments of the forces of Gemini.

Now a great transition occurs: the formative forces seem to turn the orientation of structure inward, as air enters the chest cavity and is transformed by the magic of the blood. The figure faces away from the H figure and directs itself toward the T figure. The T corresponds to that organ wherein the transformation is perceived by the ego organization. The ribs enclose from without, the lungs from within. Doublely embraced, the heart (Leo) an organ of blood perceives itself.

The journey within, intensifies further. Those eurythmy figures whose sounds are related to the zodiac regions associated with the digestive organs all stand facing forward. The figures are grand and immediate. One feels as if real personalities make their presence known… like the gods of the underworld or inner world of man. The B movement expresses this complete containment of an inner realm, like a temple removed from outer light but filled with a self-sustaining radiance. Within the metabolic organs substance is destroyed or reduced to a level which can be called ‘inorganic’. It is then recreated by the rhythmical processes of these organs so it bear the incarnation of the individual ego.

Yet another transition occurs, expressed by the spatial orientation of the CH figure. Within the basin-like structure of the pelvis an environment is created in which another ego, a new person, can anchor itself. Through fertilization, gestation, and birth, the signature of S (Scorpion or Eagle) reveals itself. The S figure is dressed as a renunciate, just as certain monastic orders dress in black and then grey to express their religious journeys, And just as the S movement in eurythmy almost manages to become a separate entity, so do the female reproductive organs sacrifice their autonomy in order to give place to the developing human being. Then, the event of birth gives a separate existence to the child. The S figure shows man’s deepest penetration into the physical world and the moment of victory for the ongoing evolution of the earth.

Through the powers of Scorpio in the human being, the physical world is conquered. Now the human organism can metamorphose further. The thighs  are the mechanisms of walking and express the will forces which seek to propel the human being into the future. The G figure faces forward but the head is turned toward the K figure. The K faces the G. The K corresponds to the hardest part of the thigh, just before it embraces the knee. Both represent the forces of Sagittarius. The knee (Capricorn) is the mediator between the innermost forces of the will and the earth itself. It floats, so to speak, in currents of dynamic forces, fluid-like and ‘sensitive’ to the interplay of the human spirit with the organism of the earth. It lives between levity and gravity. The L figure faces forward but the figure for M faces away, in the other direction. The M forms the shins, which are purely rhythmical organs. A person’s gait indicates the way in which the limb-metabolic system is embraced by the rhythmical system. The lower legs are the primary rhythmical organs of the lower region of the human form. The fact that the M faces away from the other figures of the region is significant. From the knees downward, the human body takes on a new character. It no longer strives toward incarnation but carries itself anew, toward the macrocosm. The head contains an imprint of the cosmos, the feet strive to become active in the cosmos. The foot is really a complex arch, an organ which has the power to overcome the earthly forces of weight. It is an organ of the ego. The freedom of the feet is the signature of human destiny which seeks to become independent through its evolution. The M figure, as well as the N figure, faces the region of Aries so that the past may be dissolved and remolded. The future alters the past.

The spatial orientation of the eurythmy figures reveals a hidden teaching. It tells the story of human becoming, the descent of man into matter and his triumph over it, brought about by his own activity. The human form is really a living sculpture and a hieroglyph of spiritual evolution.

One cannot carry this kind of information with one and this is surely not the intention of this article. Instead, a kind of ‘feeling’ can reside within the creative life of the artist with regard to the different sounds. These feelings or moods, as Rudolf Steiner called them, are objective realities. He brought them to poetic expression in his Twelve Moods (Zwolf Stimmungen).

This study brings questions to mind about the zodiac positions or gestures which were given in Eurythmy as Visible Speech. It is important to remember that of the twelve gestures only Aquarius has a kind of movement. All the others are at rest. It is a silent world, like a summer night when one looks into the heavens. It is as if the zodiac gestures are a portrayal of the Star-Gods themselves, of their contribution to the human figure. The eurythmy movements are dynamic. They speak and sing. They are so alive as to enable an ill person to actively participate in the anabolism of his own etheric body. If one practices doing a zodiac gesture, followed by the eurythmy movement, in light of the figure, a powerful experience can come about. One can feel how the resting zodiac becomes dynamism, creating the human form – which ‘appears’ to be at rest. Yet its life turns within and the formative forces reappear in the life of the soul as music and speech. Through the spiritual activity of art, the powers of the universe become visible. This is the art of eurythmy. One can only stand in awe before this art. It overcomes all our ‘ideas’ about ourselves and all art and shows us that we ourselves and all we do is really ‘evolving cosmos’, ‘evolving being’.

 

The Scale as a Work of Art

By Marjorie Spock

Judged by any sound criteria of art, the scale is the most perfect of musical compositions. It is a completely resolved, simple, yet subtle and eloquent expression of the ultimate theme, telling as it does in full the story of the growing up of greatness. And it does so with incomparable brevity in seven short climbing or falling steps or intervals, weaving them moreover into the classic pattern of the lemniscate.

Goethe held the test of a work of art to be its necessity. By this he meant not only that it must say something wholly original needing to be said, but body it forth in a whole and living form, every part of which is harmonious with and essential to it. He therefore called works of art a “higher nature within nature.” The scale is in his sense just such an organism of a higher order.

Prime and octave are the beginning and ending points of the scale’s unfolding, seed and blossom stages of a living whole. Each interval holds the full scale implicit in it, the prime sounding out a prophecy of things to come, the octave its fulfillment

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Marjorie Spock

By William Jens Jensen

For the better part of a century, Marjorie Spock has had a beneficial influence on the development of anthroposophy in North America. She has been a eurythmist, a Waldorf teacher, and an active practi­tioner and advocate of biodynamics and community renewal. She has written several books and articles, including In Celebration of the Human Heart; Fairy Worlds and Workers; Teaching As a Lively Art; and Eurythmy. She has also translated several books, including Nutrition and The Nature of Sub­stance by Rudolf Hauschka.

Marjorie Spock was born in New Haven, Connect­icut, early in the twentieth century. At the age of eighteen, filled with excitement and plans to study dance and with no notion of anthroposophy or the arts associated with it, she traveled to Dornach, Switzerland. Only a year earlier, in 1921, while a counselor at a girls’ camp, the painting instructor there had spoken of a wonderful dance program in “Door Knock” (as she heard the name). She under­stood these words to mean “Knock and it shall be opened unto you,” and knew instantly that she needed to go there.

Except for brief interruptions, she spent much of her youth in Dornach. No doubt, she experienced many deep and lasting impressions during that time, and even first impressions can stir a desire for self-development. Marjorie Spock says that when she first saw the first Goetheanum she “thought it was the ugliest thing” she’d ever seen. Later, she heard that Rudolf Steiner had said that, for those who are still unable to perceive their own inner nature, “one’s whole stature as a human soul became clear to oneself when seeing the Goet­heanum for the first time.”

Later, she became seriously ill and was confined to Dr. Ita Wegman’s clinic. Around Christmastime, she was released for a brief time, and on that New Year’s Eve, she witnessed the complete destruction of the Goetheanum by fire. She said,

“I think that something in me burned up that needed to be burned up as I watched it. And, for the first time, I became truly interested in anthro­posophy. Up until that time, I had loved eurythmy; now the whole seriousness of what was at stake there impressed itself on me, which I had not felt before. So I began to study anthroposophy in great earnest.”

The following year, at nineteen, she was able to attend the Christmas Conference, the series of meetings called to reoganize and renew the Gen­eral Anthroposophical Society. Although young and inexperienced in such matters, she neverthe­less sensed the significance of that event.

Around Christmas 1924, she returned to the U.S. and decided to support herself by working in an anthroposophic bookstore in New Haven. That work proved to be a tremendously valuable experi­ence— “After all,” she said, “I had a whole library of anthroposophy at my fingertips, and I read and studied with great seriousness during those years.”

After working in the bookshop for three years, she returned to Europe and studied for three years at the eurythmy school in Stuttgart. Later, she went to Dornach, where she performed eurythmy on the Goetheanum stage. During that time, she became familiar with Marie Steiner, who was acively involved in most of the eurythmy rehears­als. “Frau Dr. Steiner was simply magnificent,” she recalls, “but rather unapproachable.”

When asked about her experience of Rudolf Steiner during that time, what she expressed was singular:

I looked at his head, and I looked at his hands as I sat in his lectures, and I had the feeling that his head was sort of a condensation of all he was speaking. And the words that he was saying were tremendously significant, although I can’t say that I remember more than a sentence of all the things that he said in those years. But there was one point where I remember his gesture and his words exactly, and that was when he expressed “the wake-up call to become a person of initiative.”

Looking back, I had the sense that he meant something completely different from what hap­pened. People in the society tried to become little Rudolf Steiners, and I felt that we needed to pull together and get an entirely new kind of feeling about community—in a truly Christian sense, really helpful to one another, spiritually and in every possible way—rather than indulging in all the criticism.

It’s incredible that people should not appreciate each other, because we are, each one, developing as individuals, each one developing a completely unique ability of some kind. But instead of look­ing upon this as an absolute treasure, we cut the ground out from under the feet of people. Largely this is what has happened.

Rudolf Steiner said that, if any group of people gets together with an ideal purpose, an archangel is assigned to that group to guide it. But I don’t think that can happen unless we have the right attitude toward one another.

When asked for her impression of Rudolf Steiner’s appearance, Marjorie Spock said that “he appeared very much like Abraham Lincoln.”

He looked as though he bore up most manly under the most terrible burden … but, of course, he had many warm personal relationships. My father came over to see him when I was in Dor­nach, and I was able to introduce him to Rudolf Steiner. When we departed this wonderful meet­ing, my father said first of all, “I think he liked me. I was surprised at the way he looked—he looked just like anybody else!” I took that to be a comple­ment to Rudolf Steiner to say that he looked like anybody else.

When she again moved back to the U.S., Marjorie Spock taught for five years at the Rudolf Steiner School in New York City. Later, she spent a year teaching in a school at the Hales community near the border of Maine and Canada. The community was involved in operating a dairy and vegetable farm on 12,000 acres of forest and lakes. They also had a “sensitive crystalization” laboratory, which was able to test the nutritional vitality of food.

She returned to New York, this time to Columbia University for a major in education. Having no college degree, the school administration gave her “nine hours of examinations in all subjects” to help determine where to place her.

Due to my studies of Anthroposophy and all the interesting things that Rudolf Steiner was always reporting, I was able to pass them all. The dean of admissions said to me that he didn’t “know of a single school in America that can match that”— especially considering that I had an IQ that was only just respectible.

As a result of those tests, the college awarded her credit for three years of college and allowed her into the post-graduate program. After two years, she received a master’s degree.

For the next five years, she taught at “two of the big progressive schools” in New York—the Ethical Culture School and the Dalton school (or “chil­dren’s university”). From there, she went on to teach eurythmy for eight years at the Garden City Waldorf School. It was while living in Garden City that she began her lifelong passion for biodynamic agriculture, which led her and a friend to buy 140 acres of land in Upstate New York.

Living on their new farm, Marjorie Spock and her friend became interested in producing and selling organic vegetables, but their land was always being sprayed with pesticides—something that had also happened in Garden City. They decided that it “was absolutely essential to challenge this practice” by getting an injunction against spraying private lands. Although the suit, which reached the U.S. Supreme Court, was unsuccessful, it raised aware­ness of the issue and enfluenced the views expressed by Rachel Carson in Silent Spring. Even­turally, the courts decided that private lands could not be sprayed without the owners’ consent.

After Rudolf Steiner’s death in 1925, various diffi­culties and divisions arose in the Anthroposophical Society, which led Marjorie Spock to write two articles on community building, later published under the general title of “Group Moral Artistry.” They have been widely circulated ever since— especially among young people according to the author. One of the articles, “The Art of Goethean Conversation,” was included in the recent edition of Goethe’s Green Snake and the Beautiful Lily (see page 74).

Marjorie Spock’s most popular book these days is Fairy Worlds and Workers. It is a sensitive, imagina­tive exploration of nature’s inner beings—its Little People, the elementals, the Middle Kingdom. She says that her feeling for the natural world of fairies arose not clairvoyantly but from her connection with the earth as a farmer and gardener. That feel­ing is an ability to read certain signs of nature and to hear what it is asking for.

Today, Marjorie Spock remains active—indeed, an activist. She participates in an anthroposophic study group, she writes, and she enjoys nature, people, and the world around her. Her spirit shines brightly through her words, her sense of humor, and in her concern for our future as human beings and anthroposophists.

 

Eurythmy as a Threshold Art

By Carol Ann Williamson

 

How can eurythmy be considered an art of the threshold? For years, I have pondered this question. In the past ten years, my eurythmy destiny has led me into this sphere. A year ago, a eurythmy colleague of mine urged me to write about my encounters. At first I was reluctant to speak about these matters for obvious reasons. But after much thought, I have decided to share some of my experiences. As eurythmy is a new form of art, and its application in threshold issues is indeed a nascent art, I realized this is a realm which could use some illumination.

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A Healing Education

How can Waldorf Education Meet the Needs of Children?

Five lectures given at the West Coast Teachers Conference in Fair Oaks, California, February 15-19, 1998 by Michaela Glöchler, M. D.

Rudolf Steiner College Press

9200 Fair Oaks Boulevard

Fair Oaks, Ca. 95628

916-961-8729

Fax: 916-961-3032

bookstore@steinercollege.edu

ISBN 0-945803-48-6

101 pages Paperback

$15.95

Copyright 2000 Reprint 2003

Permission to reprint kindly granted by Dr. Glocker. This excerpt is taken from pages 80-82.

Of course you could experience during the eurythmy performance and also through your own eurythmy study how important and differentiated and delicate the study of eurythmy is. You can experience, for example, that if a teacher does something like this, that this is not a eurythmy E. It is just a nice movement, isn’t it? But a eurythmy A, a eurythmy E, is something very different. It is an etheric stream. And if you start to practice often and learn from Rudolf Steiner that our heart is the source of the etheric forces and that all the vowels have their origin in the heart region, you will know that you need first to pull back all your movement capacity, to bring it into silence, to bring it into pure intention, and feel that this impulse is something which has no weight but has intensity. The etheric quality has no physical weight. It flows purely in time and not in space. Our physical body with its substance and weight reveals itself in three-dimensional space. Our etheric body lives only in time. It’s a system of circulations, of rhythms, of all those life cycles. It is a system of developmental laws living in time. It’s the basis for the streaming changing of evolution, and this together with the physical gives what we see as the physical-etheric constitution of plants, animals, and human beings. When you study eurythmy, you have to enter into this realm of the etheric and create even physical movements out of this etheric source. You have to study for years to come into this attitude and to be able to bring movements out of the heaviness of the physical body and into this etheric lightness. And one can’t do this in eurythmy without training. I did not mean that the class teacher should replace the eurythmy teacher at school. It can’t be. Eurythmy is something very special.

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What Can Biography Projects Offer?

By Robin Mitchell

Lifetime learning requires challenges that move us out of our comfort zones, no matter how old we are.  As we grow, we stretch our present limits to embrace new abilities, gaining confidence as we develop. This is as true for older people as it is for the young. When we are at school, we know that we are constantly learning new things and discovering new skills that add to the quality of our lives, thus adding to the sum of experience that establishes our relationship to the world around us – as well as to each other.

We look into the world and discover ourselves…

We look into ourselves and discover the world.

This is also true for older people who have been in the school of life for so much longer. Only, the challenges are rather different from those that face the young. Younger people tend to look forwards with an optimism that can transform ideas into ideals – and ideals into deeds that can change the course of life. Older people have already been in that situation – therefore they can look back and evaluate the ideals that have filled their lives, the decisions made and acted upon and the outcomes of those choices. Younger people are often unsure – or even unaware – of their abilities. Older people can look back upon a lifetime during which they exercised their abilities – or did not. The question arises: To whom does a young person turn when asking questions about life – its challenges, its tasks, its requirements and its values?

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Explorations in Color

A Weekend with Annemarie Baeschlin and Dorothea Mier

By Mark Ebersole

Rudolf Steiner saw himself as a spiritual scientist, and as such avoided like the plague any form of set definitions. He could declare something in a certain way one lecture, and then appear to give a completely opposing picture of the same phenomenon in the next. Nurturing this living, changing knowledge, he defied any Wagner (as in Faust’s colleague) to take Anthroposophic knowledge home with him safely locked up in a book. The hero here is the ever-striving, ever-seeking, often sinful but ultimately redeemed Faust.

At the weekend workshop on color with Annemarie Baeschlin this fall in Spring Valley, we were privileged to experience the fruits of a lifetime of such striving and seeking, of great knowledge penetrated with personal feeling and brought into deed with love and endless effort.

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Introduction to the Eurythmy Performance

At the Christmas Conference, December 23, 1923

By Rudolf Steiner
My dear friends!
Today our guests from further afield who have already arrived make up the majority of those present at this opening performance of eurythmy. There is no need for me to speak particularly about the nature of eurythmy, for our friends know about this from various writings which have appeared in print. But especially since we are gathering once more for an anthroposophical undertaking I should like to introduce this performance with a few words. Continue reading

Journeys to Oslo

Upgrade your Eurythmy Diploma to a Bacholar of Arts Degree at the University College of Eurythmy, Oslo, Norway

By Ute Heuser

Last October I traveled to Norway in order to join ten other eurythmists at the University College of Eurythmy in Oslo. We all embarked on the part-time course to up-grade our Eurythmy Diplomas to a Bachelor Degree. After an introduction, Michael Leber took us through our first lesson. It was the best way to get to know each other and to “find our feet” – especially for the three of us who had travelled from the US. The time change was hard at first.
Soon we began work on two group-pieces: “The Cloud” by Shelley and an Allegro by Schubert (Op.164). Coralee Schmandt guided us in speech eurythmy and Michael Leber in tone eurythmy. Lessons in speech formation were held in two groups, one in English and one in Norwegian. Although I joined the English group, I was fascinated by the sound of the Norwegian language and we all got a little taste of it in our first session. Each of us began to work on an epic, lyric, and dramatic piece. We also had an introduction to a music exam we were due to take. Some frustration and confusion came about as the test needed to be translated for some of us, but in the end we all passed. I guess the language of music is universal.
After ten full and rich days it was time for us to leave. We had become a group, had formed many new connections and lots of hugs were freely shared before we all departed for our many different destinations. We took a lot of home-work with us: A solo form by Rudolf Steiner in both speech and tone eurythmy; the group pieces needed to be “kept warm”; the pieces for our speech formation presentation, and a written paper about an aspect of our teaching experience. Off I went back to Pennsylvania with a Shakespeare Sonnet (“Let me not to the marriage of true minds”) and the Rondo from the Pathetique Sonata by Beethoven in my luggage. It was hard to fit in practice times in an already busy schedule, but I was glad to have this extra challenge as part of my artistic work.
Last February I was off to Oslo again, this time we only met for six days and a lot had to be done in this short time. We continued our work on the group pieces, and had some quick practices for our solos with a speaker and pianist we were not used to. A good part of an afternoon was needed for each of us to present our epic, lyric, and dramatic texts we had worked on as part of our speech formation assignment. It was a festive moment and a great variety of pieces were shared in different languages. Each of us had to present our eurythmy solos, and again I was amazed at the richness of what was brought and shared. It was hard for me to perform just one piece as part of this presentation. By the time I felt in the flow of eurythmy my solo was already over.
Now I am looking forward to our last session in July. I am busy working on an Adagio by Mozart and a poem by Denise Levertov, both solo forms I need to present in July.  I am glad for this rich experience, for getting to know eurythmists further afield and making new contacts. Coralee and Michael are great guides in this process and I appreciate their ongoing support. If any of you are interested, they are hoping to start another course this fall. I know it is a long way away, but Oslo is well worth a visit and if you are looking for an artistic “boost” as well as a BA, this is a great way to get it both!!

Eurythmy Room Design

PRINCIPLES AND CRITERIA

By Reg Down

Waldorf schools are continuing to experience growth and development as awareness of the need for meaningful forms of education increases. Associated with this growth is a rising demand for eurythmists, as well as a need to construct or remodel spaces suitable for a healthy and thriving eurythmy program. How this space is designed can have a huge impact on the children, the teaching, and the health and well?being of the teacher.

This article is addressed primarily to the architect-builder, constituting principles and parameters to be guided by when designing a room for eurythmy. In addition, the reasons underlying these guidelines from a practical, pedagogical and anthroposophic point of view are outlined, as the presumption is made that the designer/builder has an interest in the professional needs and philosophic background of an anthroposophic or Waldorf the Waldorf client.

The architectural style of the building has been deliberately left out of the discussion as this is the province of the architect. Nevertheless, a building’s style is, or should be, consonant with its purpose. The architect is encouraged to delve into Rudolf Steiner’s contribution to architecture as his architectural insights and the art of the art of eurythmy are sourced from the same spring, and then, and then out of the architect’s own artistic nature, develop a style in harmony with the prevailing environment, community and culture. A brief bibliography is included at the end of the article.

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The Rebirth of Poetics out of the Spirit of Eurythmy

Fundamentals of a Goethean Approach to Poetics and Meter
Dr. Hedwig Greiner-Vogel
A summary and translation of Dr. Greiner’s life research, compiled by Cynthia Hoven


“The moving forces of the supersensible nature of the human being prepare the formative speech of poetry.  This hidden eurythmy was, in primeval time, the preparatory step of all language.  Just as all language has arisen out of sacred rituals, so has poetry arisen out of dance, ritual dances, which recreated the path of the stars in manifold, strictly lawful forms.  The rhythms of the stars, which have their microcosmic correspondences in the rhythmic organization, are the primal movement forces of the metered step, the poetic ‘ foot’ and the forms of poetry which have arisen there from.  The meters and poetic forms which have come down to us from ancient cultures still show spurs of these origins, and can become visible once again through eurythmy.”   p. 132

In the art of eurythmy, new perceptions of the nature of poetry are possible.  To assist both eurythmy itself and the enlivening and understanding of poetry, it is necessary to research the basic elements of the latter, namely, sounds, meter, and poetic forms.  Indeed, the study of these should be an integral part of any eurythmy training.

One of the fundamental principles of eurythmy is that speech itself springs out of the spiritual world itself, and that when humans speak, they are expressing their spiritual nature.  Vowels are expressions of the personality, and consonants are the sounds which echo and imitate nature.  The interplay of both, the alphabet, embodies in one sense the totality of the human being.

A study of language reveals an evolution of the relationship to sounds.  Greece, for instance, still ascribed names to its sounds, such as alpha for the first letter.  The Latin alphabet calls the same sound merely ‘a.’  (Such reductionism is also evident in the acronyms which are increasingly common.)  Ancient runes as well as the Hebrew Kaballah reflect the power of single sounds.  It is also said that sounds were danced in ancient cultures: eurythmy is a re-enlivenment of these dances.

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What is Eurythmy Doing in School?

Artistic and Therapeutic Eurythmy speak for themselves. What about Educational Eurythmy?

By Mary Watson

The most important educational task of eurythmy is to aid the incarnating processes of the growing child, in order that these processes may take place in the most harmonious way possible; a very lofty ideal, but nevertheless one toward which every eurythmist strives.

Plunge into the world

These processes change and assume different forms in the various stages of childhood. The very young child lives very much in his surroundings; he is ‘at one’ with the world, and it is easy for him to transform himself, through the imaginative pictures of stories, into animals, plants, beings. In these early years he must plunge into and experience to the full the world around him. He must unite himself with every tree, bird and stone, immerse himself in the rhythms of the created world. At this time the eurythmy teacher can lead the class through a Paradise, where they can learn to know the created and the creator.

Between the seventh and ninth year, the child will then begin to stand back and observe the world. He will begin to separate himself from it in his experience and even begin to be critical of things around him. The closer his unity with the world before this time, the more his powers of reverence and wonder will be enhanced during these years of separation from the whole. During this time the spiral form becomes very important in the eurythmy lesson, where the child spirals into his own inner  world, and out once again to the outer world. Repetition of this form with
various verses strengthens the individuality in its first awakening.

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Eurythmy in Waldorf Schools

By Robin W. M. Mitchell

At times, the question arises, “What is eurythmy, and why is it so important in Waldorf education?” In an attempt to answer these questions, I started by looking at a number of definitions of education. I have synthesized them into the following synopsis: “Education brings about a state of knowledge and of aesthetic moral development, resulting from a learning process which develops skills needed by a person wishing to take charge of his or her own life.” Continue reading

Truus Geraets Turning 80 and Not Yet Finished!

By Lynn Stull

During the fall of 2003, Truus was instrumental in my decision to join the first Frontier Eurythmy Training at Eurythmy Spring Valley. Throughout my training, Truus was a source of encouragement and knowledge. Over the years I have admired Truus’ commitment to the Art of Eurythmy, Rudolf Steiner, Anthroposophy, and particularly her dedication to the Archangels Michael and Uriel, which she has and continues to demonstrate through her deeds. Continue reading